Sunset on South Common

 

West Common, as detailed in a previous post, is not Lincoln’s only surrounding area of grassland.

Located just in front of Lincoln’s war memorial spire, South Common provides not only some of the most pleasant land in and around the city, but also indisputably the best viewing platform that the city – and perhaps the county – has to offer.

As its name suggests, the common lies south of the city, but also stretches round to its east.

Whereas West Common’s involvement during WWII was as an Airplane Acceptance Park, South Common was used as testing ground for military vehicles such as tanks.

A good entrance point, from the perspective of someone walking from Lincoln’s city centre, is to walk straight past Lincoln City’s football stadium and continuing parallel to the river, before crossing South Park and entering the common via the gate next to the playground area.

It is heavily sloped, and many not be easily climbable on a wet day, not least without some struggle.

There are numerous varieties of trees in the park, perhaps most notably sycamore and elm trees, and there are also several small freshwater ponds – so green that could be mistaken for grassland.

A small number of horses supposedly graze the land, but these were not present upon my visit.

Behind the common’s slope, and adjacent to the aforementioned memorial spire, lay farming fields that typify much of the county, and from here you feel a world away from inner-city Lincoln, despite its close proximity.

However, merely yards in front of this is an incomparable view of the city.

At the top of the slope lies a path, from which you can see virtually the entire city; from the rows of Victorian houses in the south-eastern area of the city, to Lincoln Cathedral and university accommodation.

Be careful not to gaze at this sight for too long, however! Myself and two others were caught by a torrent of rain, which left us drenched by the time we had left the common, let alone by the time we had returned home.

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